‘Street Fighter V’ is now available with all the latest content and no fishy security measures. Image Source: GameSpot

The Japanese video game powerhouse Capcom rolled out the latest update for the iconic title ‘Street Fighter V’ on PlayStation 4 and PC. The update includes some new features to the game, and on PC, there are some unexpected additions to the content that create issues with the machine’s functioning and represent a security threat.

The news comes as Capcom wrapped up a stellar exhibit at the 2016 Tokyo Game Show just last week. The company introduced some upcoming titles for different consoles, but at the time there was no mention of ‘Street Fighter V’ nor the new performance issues.

Capcom has rolled back the update since then following several complaints online by users unable to play the game anymore or outraged because of the safety implications that the code in the update has. ‘Street Fighter V’ is now available with all the latest content and no fishy security measures.

Street Fighter V August update also unveiled a preview for September’s update. Image Source: Game Spot
Street Fighter V August update also unveiled a preview for September’s update. Image Source: Game Spot

Capcom’s safety precautions K.O. Players’ ability to play

It all began on Thursday with the general rollout of the upgrade. The patch added Urien, a new character previously seen in ‘Street Fighter III’ wearing nothing but a very suggestive thong. Further new features include Stage KOs, which allows players to use the elements in the field to their advantage in defeating their opponent, and a Versus CPU mode to practice against the machine.

By Friday all hell had broken loose, as PC players found they were in for an additional unannounced feature: an anti-cheat piece of code that prompted a confirmation box to pop up every time the game booted.

More troubling than the annoyance of selecting yes every time was the fact that the driver rendered the computer vulnerable to many threats.

The capcom.sys driver, is supposed to be a cheating detection measure. It is designed to lie in the background waiting for any suspicious applications to meddle with the in-game mechanics of ‘Street Fighter V.’

In doing so, however, developers have accidentally jeopardized users’ security, as the rootkit turns off core defense mechanisms on your computer to perform its vigilante task.

Players took to Steam and contacted Capcom itself to address the issue once they realized what was happening. In some cases the patch was so buggy that players could not access the game at all, facing pop-up windows every couple of actions.

“We are in the process of rolling back the security measures added to the PC version of Street Fighter V. After the rollback process to the PC version, all new content from the September update will still be available to players. We apologize for the inconvenience and will have an update on the time-frame for the PC rollback solution soon,” said Capcom on its official Twitter account for the game.

Source: Polygon

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