Close up of friends with circle of smart phones

Technology under the form of a vast variety of innovative gadgets has become such an inseparable part of our daily lives, that scientists were forced to invent a new term to describe people’s pathological fear of losing their phone. It is called nomophobia (from No Mobile Phobia).

But how big is your addiction? Researchers from the Iowa State University came up with a quiz that can tell whether or not you have a serious problem.

The test was conducted to more than 300 people and the results showed that is an accurate indicator of how much a person is addicted to his/her phone and whether or not they have Nomophobia. The results of the study were recently published on the Computers in Human Behavior magazine.

If you want to find out your condition, take the test below. You can add up your total score, by adding your responses to each item. The higher the score, the more you ‘suffer’ from nomophobia.

Here are the statements:

  • I would feel uncomfortable without constant access to information through my smartphone.
  • I would be annoyed if I could not look information up on my smartphone when I wanted to do so.
  • Being unable to get the news (e.g., happenings, weather, etc.) on my smartphone would make me nervous.
  • I would be annoyed if I could not use my smartphone and/or its capabilities when I wanted to do so.
  • Running out of battery in my smartphone would scare me.
  • If I were to run out of credits or hit my monthly data limit, I would panic.
  • If I did not have a data signal or could not connect to Wi-Fi, then I would constantly check to see if I had a signal or could find a Wi-Fi network.
  • If I could not use my smartphone, I would be afraid of getting stranded somewhere.
  • If I could not check my smartphone for a while, I would feel a desire to check it.

If I did not have my smartphone with me:

  • I would feel anxious because I could not instantly communicate with my family and/or friends.
  • I would be worried because my family and/or friends could not reach me.
  • I would feel nervous because I would not be able to receive text messages and calls.
  • I would be anxious because I could not keep in touch with my family and/or friends.
  • I would be nervous because I could not know if someone had tried to get a hold of me.
  • I would feel anxious because my constant connection to my family and friends would be broken.
  • I would be nervous because I would be disconnected from my online identity.
  • I would be uncomfortable because I could not stay up-to-date with social media and online networks.
  • I would feel awkward because I could not check my notifications for updates from my connections and online networks.
  • I would feel anxious because I could not check my email messages.
  • I would feel weird because I would not know what to do.

Results:

20: Not at all nomophobic. You have a very healthy relationship with your device and have no problem being separated from it.

21-60: Mild nomophobia. You get a little antsy when you forget your phone at home for a day or get stuck somewhere without WiFi, but the anxiety isn’t too overwhelming.

61-100: Moderate nomophobia. You’re pretty attached to your device. You often check for updates while you’re walking down the street or talking to a friend, and you often feel anxious when you’re disconnected. Time for a digital detox?

101-120: Severe nomophobia. You can barely go for 60 seconds without checking your phone. It’s the first thing you check in the morning and the last at night, and dominates most of your activities in-between. It might be time for a serious intervention.

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