Dyson’s new Pure Cool Link air purifying fan promises to clean up the air in your home. This also marks the first time the British firm has chosen to foray into the Internet of Things market.

The Pure Cool link comes in two versions, namely, desk and tower. It is a new version to the company’s luxury fans and it adds an ultra-fine filter that cleans the air before circulating it around the room.

Tobacco smoke, cookers and fires, moulds, aerosols and household chemicals can all create significant levels of pollutants in the home. Dyson says the new activated carbon and 360-degree glass HEPA filter, which works in a similar manner to those fitted to high-end vacuums, captures up 99.95% of pollutants in the air in the home, including dust, smells, chemicals, pollen, spores, smoke and anything else 0.1micron or larger.

The fan will clear the air in every 30 to 60 minutes and will also continuously monitor the air and bring it back to safer levels whenever needed.

Company founder James Dyson said: “We think it is polluted outside of our homes, but the air inside can be far worse. Dyson engineers focused on developing a purifier that automatically removes ultrafine allergens, odours, and pollutants from the indoor air, feeding real-time air quality data back to you.


This fan is particularly useful for the people who suffer from allergies and also has a nifty night mode, which when activated, reduces the noise and the LED brightness.

Hugo Wilson, design lead for Dyson, said: “Modern homes have been built to be more sealed against noise and trap heat, which means the pollutants we create inside the home are also trapped and build up to levels up to five times more polluted indoors than out.

The Dyson Pure Cool Link purifier fan will cost £350 for a desk model and £450 for the larger tower. The filter will cost £50 and will need to be changed once every year after being used for 12 hours in a day.