The Internet Archive took the turn by uploading the massive Amiga games collection. Image Source: TechSpot

Retro gaming keeps trending as The Internet Archive recently made available about 10,000 titles and software of the classic Commodore computer systems, Amiga. The organization presented the collection in its web-browser library which features famous 80’s and 90’s games such as Double Dragon, Bubble Bobble, and Pac-Man.

Both nostalgic gamers and younger generations will now be able to play and download these titles for free in what seems like a sudden action from the archive as it did this without any notice.

Old school is the new school

After the recent news about Nintendo And Sega releasing new mini-versions of their classic and beloved consoles: The NES and Mega Drive.

The now extinct electronics manufacturer, Commodore, acquired the Amiga corporation in 1984, beginning a series of well-received personal computers products such as The Amiga 1000 and their best selling machine, The Amiga 500, which reported sales up to 1 million in 1989, according to PCtimeline.info.

Amiga computers became a favorite among consumers during the 80’s and 90’s by featuring modern graphics and price for the time, with a 16/32 bit color palette running on a custom Motorola chipset and its own AmigaOS.

Commodore led the personal computer market until Microsoft and Macintosh`s arrival in the early 1990’s. However, the Amiga series left a vast array of games by the time of its demise.

The collection also features AmigaOS applications

The new digital library is not limited to Amiga titles only, it also offers its numerous applications such as Deluxe Paint II, TechnoSound Turbo, Video Backup system and replication Commander, X Copy.

The archive also included game demos but left out some major titles like Defender of the Crown, Shadow of the beast, and the highly popular Secret of Monkey Island.

The organization has encountered legal bumps along the way

Legality of the new archive’s collection remains unclear. Although the San Francisco-based group remains non-profit, ┬ásome right owners have criticized the site. When the library released the first 13 years of Nintendo Power magazine issues to the public, a Nintendo representative stated that the archive did this without the company’s blessing.

“THE UNAPPROVED USE OF NINTENDO`S INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY CAN WAKEN OUR ABILITY TO TO PROTECT AND PRESERVE IT, OR TO POSSIBLY USE IT FOR NEW PROJECTS,” said the spokesperson.

For now, all the games and applications are available for free download. However, some titles may experience compatibility issues with present hardware.

Source: Engadget

 

 

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